Posts Tagged ‘cutting’

Good oxy-fuel operators know that safety depends on proper and responsible use of oxy-fuel equipment. Safety has been a central principal at Victor for 100 years. In fact, one of its early innovations was a safer regulator because founder L.W. Stettner had lost an eye in an industrial accident and wanted to prevent that from happening to others. In that spirit, here are a few oxy-fuel safety tips that may prevent accidents from occurring in the first place:

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Fire triangle:

The foundation for all oxy-fuel processes is the “Triangle of Combustion” or “Fire Triangle”. Combustion requires three elements: fuel, oxygen and heat. Operators must control each of these elements, which is why safety starts with a clean work area, free from combustibles.

Oxy-fuel processes produce flames, sparks and a small amount of infrared rays. Eye protection options include a face shield, goggles or safety glasses, all with the appropriate shade lens. If operators use a face shield, they must also wear safety glasses underneath.

For operators that work in street clothes, choose tightly woven fabrics made from natural fibers. Wool is naturally flame retardant, and blue jeans, denim and cotton duck are also good choices. Wearing a lab coat or welding jacket (or at least sleeves) is a good idea; heavy-duty applications often require leather chaps and spats. Button shirt collars and sleeves, and don’t cuff pant legs, as they provide a perfect area to catch sparks and slag.

 

Cylinder identification and handling:

Operators commonly assume cylinder colour indicates a specific gas. Unfortunately, distributors and gas suppliers can paint their cylinders any colour they want. To identify a T cylinder’s contents, read the label. If a cylinder doesn’t have a label, don’t use it.

All cylinders have a United Nations (UN) gas identification marking on their label. Common ID numbers include UN 1072 for oxygen, UN 1001 for acetylene, UN 1978 for propane and UN 1077 for propylene.

When moving cylinders, secure them with a strap or chain and install cylinder caps. Victor engineers understand that an improperly secured cylinder creates a hazardous situation. EDGE regulators feature SLAM (Shock Limitation and Absorp- tion Mechanism) technology. This three-stage “crumple zone” is built into the adjusting knob to help protect against serious cylinder damage in the event of a fall.

 

Gases in the work area:

Oxygen is the source for many gas-related accidents, and a primary culprit is using oxygen in place of compressed air, such as to blow dust off clothing or work areas.

The most widely used fuel gas is acetylene. Other fuels are commonly referred to as “alternate fuels.” These include LP gases (propane, propylene and butane) and compressed gases such as natural gas and methane.

Acetylene cylinders contain a porous mass saturated with liquid acetone. The acetylene gas is then pumped into the cylinder, absorbed into the acetone and released as it is used. Because of its nature, always use and store the acetylene cylinder in an upright position, and never use acetylene above 15 lbs. pressure. Acetylene has a tendency to disassociate above 15 PSI, which can cause a chemical reaction.

Acetylene withdraw rate is critical: never withdraw more than 1/7th of the cylinder volume per hour. For example, if a particular cylinder held 280 cubic feet, dividing that by 7 yields 40 usable cubic feet per hour of gas.

 

Equipment set-up – regulators:

Because different gases have different volume and pressure requirements, manufacturers engineer regulators for specific gases. Victor regulators are colour-coded and labeled for easy identification, such as green for oxygen and red for acetylene.

Pure oxygen can reduce the kindling temperature of petroleum-based lubricants to room temperature, leading to violent combustion. As such, the first safety check is to inspect regulator valves, threads and seats and ensure they are free of oil. Parts contaminated with oil or grease should be inspected and cleaned by qualified service personnel.

 

Equipment set-up – hoses:

There are three grades of hose. Use R and RM grade for acetylene. T grade hose may be used with any fuel gas and is the only grade allowable for alternate fuels. The acetylene hose, which is typically red, has a groove across one nut, which indicates a left-hand thread. The oxygen hose, which is typically green, will not have a groove, indicating that it’s a right-hand thread. Before attaching the hose, inspect it for oil, grease and cracks.

After attaching, remove potential contaminants by purging the hose. To purge a hose, adjust the regulator knob to about 5 PSI and allow gas to flow for a few seconds. Depending on the length of hose, that time may vary. Back out the adjusting knob after allowing adequate flow and repeat the process for the other hose.

 

Torch inspection:

Most torches come in two sections, the torch handle and various attachments for heating, cutting and welding. Before using an attachment, check its cone end and be sure the two O-rings are neither missing nor damaged. Repair them or replace them if necessary. On a cutting attachment, check the seating end for the tip. Dents or scratches here could lead to a leak and promote an accident.

Before connecting any attachment to the torch, inspect the seating area of the torch handle and the thread assembly. When attaching them, hand-tighten only. Using a wrench will damage the O-rings.

Next, inspect the cutting or heating tip to ensure the holes are free of debris. On a cutting tip, check the seating end for scratches or dents. To properly secure a cutting tip, which is a metal-to-metal seal, tighten it with a wrench. Before cutting, make sure the cutting oxygen lever moves freely.

 

Leak test:

After connecting the attachments and tips, operators need to check the entire system for leaks. The steps to perform a leak test are as follows:

Completely back out the regulator adjusting mechanism. Open the cylinder gas valve slowly until the high pressure gauge reading stabilizes, then shut off the cylinder valve. Monitor the gauge for any pressure drop, which would indicate a leak of the high pressure side of the system. If no leak is evident, open the cylinder valve and adjust the oxygen regulator to deliver 20 PSI.

Repeat the process with the fuel gas valve and regulator, but be sure to adjust the fuel gas regulator to deliver about 10 PSI. Close both the oxygen and fuel cylinder valves. Turn the adjusting screw or knob counterclockwise one-half turn. Observe the gauges on both regulators for a few minutes. If the gauge readings do not change, then the system is leak tight.

Open the cylinder valves again. Any movement of the needles indicates a possible leak. If a leak is observed, stop. Do not use leaking equipment. Check all the connections. If the leak can’t be found, have the equipment inspected by a qualified technician.

Purging the torch:

Torches also need to be purged to eliminate the possibility of gases mixing prematurely, which could lead to a flashback, or worse. To start, open the oxygen valve on the torch handle all the way. With a cutting attachment, also open the preheat oxygen valve. Depress the cutting lever for three to five seconds. Shut the oxygen valves and repeat the process for the fuel side. This is also a good time to recheck the regulators to make sure they maintained set pressure.

 

Shut down:

Regardless of fuel gas used, always shut down the oxygen first and the fuel last. This technique leak checks both valves every time the torch is shut down. A snap or a pop indicates a leaking oxygen valve, while a small flame at the end of the tip indicates a fuel gas leak.

To shut down the entire system, start by closing both cylinder valves. Next, release the pressure inside the system by opening the oxygen valve on the torch until pressure decays; do the same with the fuel gas valve. Next, release the tension on the regulator by turning the knob or screws counterclockwise until they move freely. Check the regulators to be sure they indicate zero pressure in the system.

Always follow the proper shutdown procedures when finished cutting, even if it’s just for a lunch break. Never leave oxy-fuel systems pressurized while unattended. A leaking torch or hose could cause a pool of gas to build up (such as inside a barrel), creating a serious hazard.

 

Leader, participant guidelines:

By following these guidelines, operators minimize the possibility of an accident and make the environment safe for those around them. To support training efforts, Victor offers a DVD featuring a 36-minute Oxy-Fuel Safety Video in English or Spanish and extensive supplemental documents. These documents include checklists for many of the best practices discussed in this article, a 65-page Leader’s Guide on how to conduct a successful seminar and a Participant’s Guide with training materials and quizzes to assess knowledge absorption.

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How fast can you cut an I-beam? Watch as these instructors and students try their hand with a Victor Journeyman torch at the Victor Technologies display at SkillsUSA 2013.

As we continue the celebration of Victor’s 100th Anniversary, we held a cutting contest while exhibiting at Skills USA, Kasas City. Each entrant was equipped with a Victor Journeyman cutting torch and an “I” beam to test their skills.

Michcel Tracz, Jr., Platt Technical High School, Milford, CT, took first place in Victor Technologies’ oxy-acetylene cutting contest at SkillsUSA 2013. Michcel’s winning time of 44.4 seconds beat the next competitor by 5.1 seconds. Victor Technologies district manager Kevin Showers, shown observing, noted that Michcel’s torch angle enabled gravity to help the slag run clear of the cutting path and reduce his cutting time. Michcel won a Victor Medalists 250 cutting system for demonstrating his skill, as did the second and third place winners.

Michcel Tracz, Jr., Platt Technical High School, Milford, CT, took first place in Victor Technologies’ oxy-acetylene cutting contest at SkillsUSA 2013. Michcel’s winning time of 44.4 seconds beat the next competitor by 5.1 seconds. Victor Technologies district manager Kevin Showers, shown observing, noted that Michcel’s torch angle enabled gravity to help the slag run clear of the cutting path and reduce his cutting time. Michcel won a Victor Medalists 250 cutting system for demonstrating his skill, as did the second and third place winners.

Victor Technologies International, Inc. 40 minutes ago Randy Murphy, an instructor at Traviss Career Center in Lakeland, FL., took second place with a time of 49.5 seconds.

Victor Technologies International, Inc.
40 minutes ago
Randy Murphy, an instructor at Traviss Career Center in Lakeland, FL., took second place with a time of 49.5 seconds.

Caption: Caleb Stroud of North Central Kansas Technical College, Beloit, KS., took third with a time of 50.2 seconds.

Caption: Caleb Stroud of North Central Kansas Technical College, Beloit, KS., took third with a time of 50.2 seconds.

With Skills USA in full swing on Tuesday, we had a great time letting students and welders alike try out some of the cutting, gas control & specialty welding equipment we had on display. The Fabricator 211i, the latest in the line of 3-in-1 multi-process welding systems was a huge hit! Take a peek!

With the economy still providing mixed signals, Victor Technologies is approaching business with optimism. Our branding
effort is in full swing, and we are enthusiastic about our newest product offerings both in the U.S. and around the globe.
Beginning with the company name change in May of 2012, and following in October with the alignment of our cutting
brands under the Victor name, we have focused on optimizing the performance of our brand portfolio. This is reflected in the
introduction of new packaging and displays for Victor, along with new “Victor green” trade dress and packaging for Victor Thermal
Dynamics manual and automated product lines.
To our valued distributors, business partners and end users, we share the message that coupled with our brand changes, our
resolve in the pursuit of strong product solutions, innovation and technology remains unchanged.
For example, Victor has introduced its new line of 400 Series oxy-fuel torches that offer better ergonomics and end-user driven
features such as a new contoured handle, three-tube cutting attachment design and color-coded valves for clarity and enhanced
safety. The 400 Series boasts a contoured, high-strength alloy torch handle that, while lighter than a brass handle, balances better
in operators’ hands and better resists wear and abuse.
In Victor Thermal Dynamics Automation, the rollout of the AutoCut XT and UltraCut XT lines represent the next generation in
precision plasma cutting. Ultra-Cut XT systems provide the flexibility to increase cutting power and the assurance of superior
quality, higher productivity and lower cutting costs. And because of its expansion capabilities, there is never a concern about
choosing the right system.
In specialty welding, Tweco also boasts a new logo and refreshed packaging. In addition to the new Tweco Velocity MIG
consumables and light-duty Tweco Fusion MIG guns, Tweco has also announced its scheduled launch of the Tweco Classic Series
MIG guns, an enhancement to the original “numbered series” that is arguably one of the most popular gun designs in the world.
Tweco Classic enhancements will include interlocking joints for superior toughness, an angled trigger for a more comfortable pull
and refined, modernized lines.
In addition to these exciting announcements, we invite you to help us celebrate this year’s 100th anniversary of the Victor brand.
Please read about our 100th Anniversary contests in this issue of NewsUpdate, and we invite you to share in a special celebration
with us later this year at the 2013 Fabtech. Stay tuned for additional details, and again, thank you for your valued role in delivering
Victor Technologies cutting, gas control and specialty welding products that set the standard for versatility and performance.

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Regards,
Joseph F. Mueller
Sr. Vice President, GM Sales, Americas

Catch up with the latest in cutting, gas control and specialty welding with the latest edition of the Victor Technologies’ News Update.

In this issue, find out about the newest products including the Victor 400 Series of cutting torches and handles, the Victor G Series regulators, Tweco Fusion MIG guns and more.

We’ve also got some great articles on welding education, safety and best practices.  Check it out!

Q1Q2-2013-Victor-Technologies-Sales-and-Marketing-Newsletter

 

 

PMUB-Group-Shot
Learn More About the Latest Solutions
from Victor Technologies!
 
For 2013 we are excited to share some great new products and solutions, which include refreshed brand marks and new packaging. Victor Technologies is committed to delivering innovative new products for cutting, welding and gas control. Here are some key updates: 
 

Victor-PMUB-HeaderNew Victor® 400 Series Torch, Handle and
G Series Regulator

Victor400TorchThe 400 Series is a two-piece torch that incorporates innovative handle and cutting attachment designs, offering better ergonomics, a clearer view of the cutting path, visual cues for easier use and enhanced safety. The G-Series Regulators feature compact industrial designs, unique contrasting gauges for better clarity, and color-coded knobs for improved safety.Download PDF >

 

Arcair-Matic® N7500 Travel System PackagesArcair-PMUB-Headerbug-o-travel-systemArcair®, the industry leader in air carbon-arc products, joined together with leading travel system manufactures to bring to the market the best automated metal removal system providing superior performance, flexibility, versatility, and safety for your metal removal applications.

Download PDF >

 

Stoody® Hardfacing & Hardbanding WiresStoody-PMUB-Header
For Oil & Gas Exploration, Refining and Transportation Applications
StoodyWireRod1-MODStoody has developed a series of wires to support end-users engaged in oil and natural gas exploration, transportation and processing applications. These wires extend your equipment’s part life and deliver greater productivity when hardfacing and hardbanding.Download PDF >

 


Thermal-Arc-PMUB-HeaderThermal Arc®Introduces the 186 AC/DC Portable AC/DC HF TIG System
TA186-Left-Facing-2-REFLECTThe 186 AC/DC is a fully featured, professional performance machine that has been made easy to use with integrated controls and a simple to use set up chart.

Featuring three process capabilities: HF TIG, LIFT TIG, and STICK solutions with AC and DC output, this
machine has the power you need.

Download PDF >

 

Victor-Thermal-Dynamics-PMUB-HeaderVictor® Thermal Dynamics® Introduces HeavyCut TechnologyHeavyCut-2A Victor® Thermal Dynamics® integrated plasma system delivers the dynamic real-time process control required to make quality cuts consistently. And with HeavyCut technology, precision performance is extended on mild steel up to 2″ (50 mm).Download PDF >

Victor® Thermal Dynamics® Introduces One Torch for VirtuallyAny Plasma Cutting System

1Torch---Plasma-Cutting-1_greenThe Victor Thermal Dynamics 1Torch utilizes revolutionary technology that allows these torches to work with almost any plasma cutting system. 1Torch allows end-users to standardize torches and consumables on a variety of manufacturers’ systems, thus reducing inventory requirements and corresponding expenses associated with operating multiple systems. One torch for virtually any plasma cutting system!

Download PDF >

Tweco-PMUB-BannerNew Tweco® Velocity MIG Consumables Offer Quick Change Tip, Less Complexity, Improved Arc Stability, and Reduced SpatterVelocity-consumable-breakout
Tweco introduces its new Velocity MIG consumables platform, which is integrated into the new Tweco Fusion series of light-duty MIG guns.The non-threaded, “drop-in” style Velocity contact tip eliminates the need to use vice-grips, welpers or other tools to remove the tip, even if the wire burns back and fuses inside the tip. The Velocity consumables design integrates the gas diffuser into theconductor tube. This creates an improved all-copper conductor path thatprovides better electrical conductivity and transfers heat more efficiently away from the tip. As a result, the arc becomes more stable and predictable. 

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To learn more about the full range of innovative, industry leading educational opportunities that the Victor Training Team offers, visit the Victor Technologies Training Center.

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