The new Tweco® auto-darkening welding helmet features four sensors for enhanced performance at an affordable price. It can be used in both weld mode and grind mode and will darken when TIG welding even at 5 amps. The helmet has a large viewing area of 3.86” x 1.69”, weighs 16 oz., uses solar power to eliminate the need to change batteries and offers all these features for an MSRP of $142.

Backed by Tweco support, quality, reliability and a two-year warranty, the new helmet comes in three popular styles: Patriot Eagle, Skull & Fire and Yellow Dragon.

Performance and Value
When switching from light-to-dark, this Tweco helmet darkens in 33 microseconds, or 1/30,000th of a second, one of the fastest reaction times available (by way of comparison, a human eye blink takes 3/10th to 4/10th of a second). When switching from dark-to-light, users can select from three switching speeds: short (0.25s to 0.35s), medium (0.35s to 0.50s) and long (0.50s to 0.80). Operators in high amperage applications prefer a longer transition time, giving the red-hot weld puddle a chance to cool.

Designed to combine safety, strength, flexibility and comfort, the Tweco WeldSkill four-sensor helmet passes every one of the 49 tests required under the ANSI Z87.1-2010 standards. This includes the ability to retain its auto-darkening performance even after high impact by a steel ball.
Tweco placed the sensitivity and delay knobs on the outside of the helmet shell so that operators can make adjustments while welding. When setting the helmet down, a recessed lens design prevents the faceplate from touching the table, protecting it from scratches.

“The four-sensor Tweco helmet offers an unmatched combination of safety, performance and value,” says Indy Datta, Tweco Brand Management. “It was built to withstand the rigors of daily fab shop use, but with an MSRP of $142, DIY welders can also enjoy professional-grade functions that make welding easier.”

The Tweco line includes an extensive array of products from the basic manual welding tools and accessories to MIG guns, consumables, and a complete selection of products for precision robotic welding applications.

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Joe Mueller, Vice President and GM of Sales in the Americas, provides a quick overview of the changes you’ll see from us at FABTECH. They include our new Victor green trade dress for all the cutting brands and extending the Tweco brand and its signature black and yellow colors to our welding power sources. Visit us and learn more!

Got skills? Show them off at the Victor Technologies booth by signing up for our daily cutting contests, held in celebration of the 100th Anniversary of the Victor brand.

Video  —  Posted: November 18, 2013 in Uncategorized
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Visit Us at Fabtech 2013!

Posted: November 6, 2013 in Cutting, Welding

Fabtech-logo

Fabtech 2013 is fast approaching and we are excited to feature an exciting array of industry leading products in cutting, gas control, and specialty welding.

  • We Bring Intelligence to the Table™. – The Next Generation Victor®Thermal Dynamics® Ultra-Cut XT automated plasma cutting power sources, with StepUP™ Modular Power Technology, deliver higher productivity and lower cutting costs.
  • We Listened. We Delivered. – The New Victor® ST400 Straightline oxy-fuel torch features a patented contoured handle, excellent visibility and enhanced safety.
  • Joining Two Things Is What We Do Best. – Thermal Arc® and Tweco® are combining forces, beginning with the launch of the Fabricator 141i, the first 115V DIY welder for MIG, Stick, and TIG.

Please be sure to stop by the Victor Technologies booth to see these great products and much more, including a chance to win new equipment in our Victor 100th Anniversary Cutting Contest!

“Every four years, the international specialist world of joining, cutting and surfacing demonstrates its innovative force – and SCHWEISSEN & SCHNEIDEN is its forum for this purpose . In 2013, the experts in one of the key sectors of modern production technology will come together in Essen for the 18th time already. On September 16 – 21, over 1,000 exhibitors from 40 nations will present their innovations – including a large number of global innovations.

Click HERE to view the Photo Gallery.

Ultra-Cut-100,200,300,400-Automated-Plasma-Cutting-Systems

Victor Thermal Dynamics has launched the Ultra-Cut XT Series of power sources for automated plasma cutting as part of its integrated system of components that deliver higher productivity and lower cutting costs. “The Ultra-Cut XT series is the most advanced power supply available today,” says Martin Quinn, CEO, Victor Technologies. “This next generation series provides exceptional cost-performance benefits, and supports our integrated approach of optimizing each component at the cutting table, leading to more profitable plasma cutting.”

Higher Productivity and Superior Cut Quality

The Ultra-Cut XT systems’ superior cut quality enables parts to go directly from the cutting table to welding, painting or assembly without expensive secondary operations. The Ultra-Cut XT delivers ISO Class 3 or better cuts on any material from gauge to 2-inch thick, noticeably reducing bevel and the need for post-cut finishing.

On non-ferrous materials, the Ultra-Cut XT produces superior cut quality and a lower cost per cut using the Water Mist Secondary (WMSä) process, which incorporates nitrogen as the plasma gas and ordinary tap water for shielding. On stainless steel, the WMS process cuts up to 300 percent faster and lowers cost-per cut by 20 percent or more compared to systems that use Argon-Hydrogen for the plasma gas.

Lowering Cost on Thicker Cuts

With the ability to cut 1-inch thick steel at 80 inches per minute (IPM) and 2-inch thick steel at 30 IPM, the Ultra-Cut XT 400 can lower the cost per cut and makes it competitive with the oxy-fuel process.

The Ultra-Cut XT also lowers the cost per cut by using HeavyCutä consumables for cutting at 300 and 400 amps. These consumables use a multiple hafnium insert as opposed to a single insert and feature a two-piece tip that runs cooler. Better cooling extends parts life and cut accuracy across the life of the tip, especially when piercing at higher amperages. These combined features extend consumables life by up to 45 percent, which in turn reduces cut cost per foot.

IMG_7012-MODEfficiency, Flexibility and Reliability 

Compared to previous models, Ultra-Cut XT systems draw 20 percent less primary current and have an average electrical efficiency of 92%. They meet EU Level Five efficiency standards and help companies everywhere lower utility bills.

The Ultra-Cut XT series is available in 100 to 400-amp configurations for cutting plate up to 2” (50mm) thick. All models feature a common cabinet and components. Users can increase the output from 100 amps all the way up to 400 amps by adding inverter blocks. With its modular design, parts inventory is minimized along with repair time.  A LED error display indicates machine status to accelerate troubleshooting, and should an inverter block malfunction, cutting can continue with the remaining blocks.

“The Ultra-Cut XT Series works the way our customers work – intelligently,” says Dirk Ott, VP – Global Plasma Automation Brand, Victor Technologies. “The ability to add inverter blocks means fabricators never have to worry about purchasing a system that does not have enough capacity to meet future needs.”

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Good oxy-fuel operators know that safety depends on proper and responsible use of oxy-fuel equipment. Safety has been a central principal at Victor for 100 years. In fact, one of its early innovations was a safer regulator because founder L.W. Stettner had lost an eye in an industrial accident and wanted to prevent that from happening to others. In that spirit, here are a few oxy-fuel safety tips that may prevent accidents from occurring in the first place:

Cylinder-Safetycropped

Fire triangle:

The foundation for all oxy-fuel processes is the “Triangle of Combustion” or “Fire Triangle”. Combustion requires three elements: fuel, oxygen and heat. Operators must control each of these elements, which is why safety starts with a clean work area, free from combustibles.

Oxy-fuel processes produce flames, sparks and a small amount of infrared rays. Eye protection options include a face shield, goggles or safety glasses, all with the appropriate shade lens. If operators use a face shield, they must also wear safety glasses underneath.

For operators that work in street clothes, choose tightly woven fabrics made from natural fibers. Wool is naturally flame retardant, and blue jeans, denim and cotton duck are also good choices. Wearing a lab coat or welding jacket (or at least sleeves) is a good idea; heavy-duty applications often require leather chaps and spats. Button shirt collars and sleeves, and don’t cuff pant legs, as they provide a perfect area to catch sparks and slag.

 

Cylinder identification and handling:

Operators commonly assume cylinder colour indicates a specific gas. Unfortunately, distributors and gas suppliers can paint their cylinders any colour they want. To identify a T cylinder’s contents, read the label. If a cylinder doesn’t have a label, don’t use it.

All cylinders have a United Nations (UN) gas identification marking on their label. Common ID numbers include UN 1072 for oxygen, UN 1001 for acetylene, UN 1978 for propane and UN 1077 for propylene.

When moving cylinders, secure them with a strap or chain and install cylinder caps. Victor engineers understand that an improperly secured cylinder creates a hazardous situation. EDGE regulators feature SLAM (Shock Limitation and Absorp- tion Mechanism) technology. This three-stage “crumple zone” is built into the adjusting knob to help protect against serious cylinder damage in the event of a fall.

 

Gases in the work area:

Oxygen is the source for many gas-related accidents, and a primary culprit is using oxygen in place of compressed air, such as to blow dust off clothing or work areas.

The most widely used fuel gas is acetylene. Other fuels are commonly referred to as “alternate fuels.” These include LP gases (propane, propylene and butane) and compressed gases such as natural gas and methane.

Acetylene cylinders contain a porous mass saturated with liquid acetone. The acetylene gas is then pumped into the cylinder, absorbed into the acetone and released as it is used. Because of its nature, always use and store the acetylene cylinder in an upright position, and never use acetylene above 15 lbs. pressure. Acetylene has a tendency to disassociate above 15 PSI, which can cause a chemical reaction.

Acetylene withdraw rate is critical: never withdraw more than 1/7th of the cylinder volume per hour. For example, if a particular cylinder held 280 cubic feet, dividing that by 7 yields 40 usable cubic feet per hour of gas.

 

Equipment set-up – regulators:

Because different gases have different volume and pressure requirements, manufacturers engineer regulators for specific gases. Victor regulators are colour-coded and labeled for easy identification, such as green for oxygen and red for acetylene.

Pure oxygen can reduce the kindling temperature of petroleum-based lubricants to room temperature, leading to violent combustion. As such, the first safety check is to inspect regulator valves, threads and seats and ensure they are free of oil. Parts contaminated with oil or grease should be inspected and cleaned by qualified service personnel.

 

Equipment set-up – hoses:

There are three grades of hose. Use R and RM grade for acetylene. T grade hose may be used with any fuel gas and is the only grade allowable for alternate fuels. The acetylene hose, which is typically red, has a groove across one nut, which indicates a left-hand thread. The oxygen hose, which is typically green, will not have a groove, indicating that it’s a right-hand thread. Before attaching the hose, inspect it for oil, grease and cracks.

After attaching, remove potential contaminants by purging the hose. To purge a hose, adjust the regulator knob to about 5 PSI and allow gas to flow for a few seconds. Depending on the length of hose, that time may vary. Back out the adjusting knob after allowing adequate flow and repeat the process for the other hose.

 

Torch inspection:

Most torches come in two sections, the torch handle and various attachments for heating, cutting and welding. Before using an attachment, check its cone end and be sure the two O-rings are neither missing nor damaged. Repair them or replace them if necessary. On a cutting attachment, check the seating end for the tip. Dents or scratches here could lead to a leak and promote an accident.

Before connecting any attachment to the torch, inspect the seating area of the torch handle and the thread assembly. When attaching them, hand-tighten only. Using a wrench will damage the O-rings.

Next, inspect the cutting or heating tip to ensure the holes are free of debris. On a cutting tip, check the seating end for scratches or dents. To properly secure a cutting tip, which is a metal-to-metal seal, tighten it with a wrench. Before cutting, make sure the cutting oxygen lever moves freely.

 

Leak test:

After connecting the attachments and tips, operators need to check the entire system for leaks. The steps to perform a leak test are as follows:

Completely back out the regulator adjusting mechanism. Open the cylinder gas valve slowly until the high pressure gauge reading stabilizes, then shut off the cylinder valve. Monitor the gauge for any pressure drop, which would indicate a leak of the high pressure side of the system. If no leak is evident, open the cylinder valve and adjust the oxygen regulator to deliver 20 PSI.

Repeat the process with the fuel gas valve and regulator, but be sure to adjust the fuel gas regulator to deliver about 10 PSI. Close both the oxygen and fuel cylinder valves. Turn the adjusting screw or knob counterclockwise one-half turn. Observe the gauges on both regulators for a few minutes. If the gauge readings do not change, then the system is leak tight.

Open the cylinder valves again. Any movement of the needles indicates a possible leak. If a leak is observed, stop. Do not use leaking equipment. Check all the connections. If the leak can’t be found, have the equipment inspected by a qualified technician.

Purging the torch:

Torches also need to be purged to eliminate the possibility of gases mixing prematurely, which could lead to a flashback, or worse. To start, open the oxygen valve on the torch handle all the way. With a cutting attachment, also open the preheat oxygen valve. Depress the cutting lever for three to five seconds. Shut the oxygen valves and repeat the process for the fuel side. This is also a good time to recheck the regulators to make sure they maintained set pressure.

 

Shut down:

Regardless of fuel gas used, always shut down the oxygen first and the fuel last. This technique leak checks both valves every time the torch is shut down. A snap or a pop indicates a leaking oxygen valve, while a small flame at the end of the tip indicates a fuel gas leak.

To shut down the entire system, start by closing both cylinder valves. Next, release the pressure inside the system by opening the oxygen valve on the torch until pressure decays; do the same with the fuel gas valve. Next, release the tension on the regulator by turning the knob or screws counterclockwise until they move freely. Check the regulators to be sure they indicate zero pressure in the system.

Always follow the proper shutdown procedures when finished cutting, even if it’s just for a lunch break. Never leave oxy-fuel systems pressurized while unattended. A leaking torch or hose could cause a pool of gas to build up (such as inside a barrel), creating a serious hazard.

 

Leader, participant guidelines:

By following these guidelines, operators minimize the possibility of an accident and make the environment safe for those around them. To support training efforts, Victor offers a DVD featuring a 36-minute Oxy-Fuel Safety Video in English or Spanish and extensive supplemental documents. These documents include checklists for many of the best practices discussed in this article, a 65-page Leader’s Guide on how to conduct a successful seminar and a Participant’s Guide with training materials and quizzes to assess knowledge absorption.